The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the NASA Terra satellite has been collecting global data since March 2000 and on the Aqua satellite since June 2002. The physical and radiative properties of cloud layers from MODIS data are retrieved from multiwavelength reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation measurements by the MODIS Atmospheres team and the CERES Science Team. Terra has been monitored when it passes close to the ARM sites. In this paper we compare cirrus cloud properties derived from ground-based remote sensing data with similar cloud properties derived from MODIS. In order to improve the space-time correlation between the satellite and ground-based observations, we use data from a wind profiler to define the cloud advective streamline from along which the comparisons are made. In this paper we examine approximately two dozen cases of cirrus and explore a statistical approach to the comparison that relaxes the requirement that clouds occur over the ground-based instruments during the overpass instant. The physical and radiative properties of cloud layers are derived from the MODIS data separately by the MODIS Atmospheres team and the CERES Science Team using multiwavelength reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation measurements. Using two ground-based cloud property retrieval algorithms and the two MODIS algorithms, we show a positive correlation in the effective particle size, the optical thickness, the ice water path, and the cloud top pressure between the various methods although the biases can be significant. Classifying the clouds by optical thickness, we also demonstrate that the regionally averaged cloud properties derived from MODIS are similar to those diagnosed from the ground.